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COLLEGE 



AEW3 



Vol. 3. No. ir. 



WELLESLET, MASS., WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 1904. 



Price, 5 Cents 



The Faculty Barnswallows. 

By seven o'clock, Saturday evening, the 
Barn was full; not a seat was to be had. 
Some of the girls came at six o'clock and 
waited patiently till half-past seven; many 
of the houses had dinner earlier that the 
girls might go soon to the Barn — for this 
was the night of the year in Barnswallows 
history; the night when the Wellesley Fac- 
ulty laid aside the academic and them- 
selves furnished the entertainment for the 
College. 

For weeks we had been looking forward 
to this entertainment and wondering as to 
the nature of it, but every thing was kept 
a profound secret, until the actual occur- 
rence Saturday night. The whole thing 
was a take-off on the February Glee Club 
concert. Of course the club and the 
ushers were dressed in white, and wore 
large bunches of violets as is the custom 
at the February concert. Miss Sherrard 
and Miss Davis acted as ushers and dis- 
tributed the programs among the guests. 
Promptly at half-past seven the Glee Club 
marched up the center aisle from the rear 
door of the Barn to the stage, and taking 
the characteristic, Glee Club pose, — head 
forward, hands behind back — began to 
sing college songs. In spite of the note 
at the end of the program, requesting the 
audience to "refrain from applause during 
each number," enthusiastic shouts were 
heard from the house at frequent intervals 
during the first number and at the end 
the applause was so persistent that the 
Club was forced to give an encore. 

With the kind permission of the Club 
we print the following songs from the first 
number: 

(To the tune of " Die Wacht am Rhein. ") 
The faculty sedate and grave 
One night an entertainment gave, 
To make some fun for everyone, 
And please the girls at Wellesley. 
Said they, " Exams are really o'er, 
The busy sign appears no more. 
Let's to the Barn and see what we can do 
To drive away the thoughts of blank books 
blue." 

Said they, "It matters not a whit 

How poor the joke, how dull the wit, 

Such critics kind you'll never find 

As greet us here at Wellesley. 

For if we stand up in a row : 

And merely wink or nod just so, 

They'll clap the hand and laugh and call it 

grand. 
Those funny docile girls at Wellesley. 

'Tis true they sometimes go to sleep, 
When lectures wax a bit too deep, 
'Tis true they sometimes read or sew 
When recitations prove too slow. 



Yet when we try to play the fool 
For one brief evening out of school, 
What keen, attentive, rapturous faces! O! 
O what a pity 'tis not always so! 

MIDYEARS. 
(To the tune of "Coming Thro' the Rye.") 

When the snow-drift fills the hollows 

Where the squirrels run, 
When examination follows 

Ex-am-in-a-tion, 
When no cramming rills the hollows 

In some heads about, 
Then to cheer the drooping swallows. 

Lo, the owls come out. 

Solemn owls attempt to twitter 

In their rancous tones, 
While the swallows sit and titter 

At their chaperons. 
If an owl attempts to twit her 

Need the swallow cry? 
'Tis the Facts of life are bitter, 

Not the Faculty . K. L. B. 

Next came the " Kindersymphonie," 
representative of the Mandolin Club at the 
February concert. All who took part 
were dressed as little children : some in old- 
fashioned American costume, some in the 
fashionable child dress of the present day, 
and some in German or in Scotch fashion, 
so that the tableau formed by the members 
of the Kindersymphonie was as pretty and 
interesting as the harmonious music pro- 
duced by the violins, quails and cuckoos. 

At the end of part second of the pro- 
gram, the Club and Kindersymphonie 
joined together in a grand finale. This 
was a medley, of which the principal airs 
to be distinguished were. " Ta-ra-ra-boom- 
de-a" and "There's Music in the Air. " 

For the benefit of all lovers of "Where, 
O, Where?" we print the "Ubi Gentium" 
as it was sung by the Glee Club 

Where, O where, are the blooming stu- 
dents? 

Where, O where, are the blooming stu- 
dents ? 

Where, O where, are the blooming stu- 
dents ? 

Pale now from the cramming nights. 

They've gone out from their youthful fresh- 
ness, 

They've gone out from their youthful fresh- 
ness, 

They've gone out from their youthful fresh- 
ness, 

Pale now from their cramming nights. 

Where, O where, are their funds of knowl- 
edge? 

Where O, where, are their funds of knowl- 
edge? 

Where, O where, are their funds of knowl- 
edge? 



Safe now on the blue book's page. 

They've poured out their mind's last con- 
tents. 

They've poured out their mind's last con- 
tents, 

They've poured out their minds last con- 
tents. 

Safe now on the blue book's page. 

Where, O where, are the blue books 

weighty ? 
Where, () where, are the blue books 

weighty? 
Where, O where, are the blue books 

weighty? 
Safe now on the rubbish heap. 
They've beenread till they're blueno longer, 
They've been read till they're blueno longer, 
They've been read till they're blueno longer. 
Safe now on the rubbish heap. 

Where, O where, are the teachers learned ? 

Where, O where, are the teachers learned? 

Where, O where, are the teachers learned? 

Safe now in the orchestra. 

They've gone out from their gowns aca- 
demic. 

They've gone out from their gowns aca- 
demic, 

They're gone out from their gowns aca- 
demic, 

Safe now in the orchestra. 

At the end of the performance. President 
Hazard, who, in the role of Frau Wagner, 
occupied a box at the right of the stage, 
spoke a few words of appreciation and 
presented a medal of the first degree to Dr. 
Roberts, the "Herr Direktor" of the or- 
chestra, and two medals of the second 
degree, — one to Fraulein Muller, " Erster 
Kapellmeister" of the orchestra, the other 
to Miss Merrill, the leader of the Glee Clnb. 

Reading by Miss Dix. 

The statement was made last week in 
the College News that Miss Buelah Dix, 
Radcliffe, '97, would lecture on Saturday 
afternoon. The editor was misinformed 
for Miss Dix did not lecture but gave a very 
delightful author's reading in the Faculty 
Parlor. Miss Dix read from her latest 
book, "Blount of Breckenhow," an his- 
torical novel, the scene of which is laid in 
Yorkshire, England, in the years 1642- 
1645 at the beginning of the Civil War. 
Oxford is the scene of the latter part. The 
story is told entirely in letters and deals 
with the life of one James Blount. The 
readings were well chosen, giving a 
clear insight into the characters of 
the book. Two letters, those describing 
Blount's degradation and dismissal from 
the army, and his death, with Arundel at 
his side, are especially dramatic and were 
read with an author's appreciation. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



Coll ege IR ews. 

Press of N. A. Lindsey &. Co., Boston. 



Published weekly. Subscription price, 75 cents 
a year to resident subscribers; $1.00 per year to 
non-resident subscribers. 

All business correspondence should be ad- 
dressed to ANNIE V. LUFF, Business Manager 
College News. 

All subscriptions should be sent to Cora L. 
Butler. 

Editor-in-Chief. Carolyn P Nelson, 1905 

Associate Editor, Helen R Norton. 1905 

Literary Editors, 

Elisabeth Hardman, 1905 Ellen Manchester, 1905 

Jessie Gidley. 1906 

Alumnae Editor. Roxana H Vivian, 94 

Managing Editors 

Annie V. Luff, 1904 

Cora L Butler, 1904 Edith Fox, 1904 



"Bnteved as second class matter November 18, 
i!to:;. at the post office at Wellesley, Mass., under 
the Act of Congress, March :;. 1879. 



Whatever we may have thought — or not 
thought — concerning the advisability of a 
Genera] Secretary for the Christian Associa- 
tion, now that the matter is practically de- 
cided in favor of asking Miss Slack to take 
the position for a year's trial there is hut 
one path open to us : namely, to lend our 
best effort towards making the trial a suc- 
cessful one. to add to the youth, enthusiasm. 
and trained effort of our new helper an 
echoing enthusiasm and an honest, earnest 
endeavor to follow where she points the way. 

It will he hard for her at first, it cannot 
help hut he. We here at Wellesley are not 
satisfied with our Christian Association 
work, and we are satisfied that we want 
some one to come over and help us. want 
her very much indeed. Thus far the out- 
look, the attitude of groping for something 
better, is hopeful; but aren't we groping a 

little blindly'.' And this very blindness, 
this rather characteristic shirking of our 
responsibility to think the matter through, 
each one for herself, and then say each one 
what she thinks ; to have both the courage 
of conviction, and real conviction behind 
courage — is not such blindness as this going 
to make well-nigh impossible that real suc- 
cess for which we all hope? No one person 
can solve our problem for us. 



Novelties 

Jewelry, 

College Pins, 

Silk Belts, 

Crushed Leather 
Belts, 

Collar Pins. 




41 Summer Street, 
Next door Hovey's. 

Boston. 
Wholesale and Retail. 



SPECTACLES 

«* EYEGLASSES. 



In our enlarged quarters we are better pre- 
pared than ever to lurnish you with the very 
best Optical Goods, at our usual moderate 
prices. We solicit a comparison of our goods 
and prices. 

Pinkham «Sr Smith, 

The Back Bay Opticians, 
288 Boylston Street, Boston. 



At present our notions as to the duties of 
the new secretary are. to say the least, a 
little vague. She is to revive our religious 
spirit, though she is not to be. primarily, a 
person to whom we are to come with doubts 
and despairs : she is to relieve the officers 
of technical, mechanical work, and appor- 
tion work more equitably among members 
of the association -all this without taking 
from the officers any of their present duties : 
she is tO furnish her own ideas for new de- 
partures, and new departures for our ideas. 
—in short be the leaven which leaveneth 
the lump. 

All of which is satisfactory as far as it 
goes; and of course we are not all trained 
secretaries, and therefore cannot know 
definitely the duties of a trained secretary. 
Hut it would seem that a little less vague- 
ness as to what we do want, would make 
more practicable that ardent support which 
we all stand ready to give. 



The editors call the attention of their 
literary subscribers to the changes which 
have been made in regard to some of the 
departments of the Xews. As heretofore, 
all copy should be in the hands of the 
Editorial Hoard by Friday noon. The 
various departments are under the super- 
vision of the following editors; 
College Notes, \ 
College Calendar, j 

Free Press 1 Elisabeth Hardman 

Parliament ot Tools, J 

Society Not r-n M , 

, ■ . hllen Manchester 

Literary Notes, J > 

Alumna- Xotes, Miss Vivian 



Helen Norton 



Ladies' Neckwear Dept. 



Beautiful 



Novelties 



Coming in Every Week. 

THE FASHIONABLE NECKWEAR OF 
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SHEPARD NORWELL CO., 

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BOSTON REPRESENTATIVE 

— FOR — 

Forsythe's Waists, 

Belts, Stocks, 

In our Ladies' Department will be found a 
full assortment of Neckwear, (doves and Col- 
lars, mannish styles, Imported Hand Made 
French Hosiery, in silk ami lisle. 

F. W. B. SELLORS & CO., 

172 Tremont St., Boston. 



ARTISTIC PHOTOGRAPHS 

NOTMAN, 

384 Boylston St. and 3 Park St.. Boston 
Also 1286 Mass. Ave., Cambridge 

SPECIAL RATES TO WELLESLEY STUDENTS 

Wellesley Steam Laundry, 

BLOSSOM STREET. 

All kinds of Fancy Ironing at reasonable 
prices. Collections made Monday and Tues- 
day; deliveries, Thursday and Saturday. 



Removed to Our New Buildiug, 


418 and 420 Washington Street, Boston 


LADIES' HATS 


AND FURS 


l'p one Might — elevator. 


College Girls' Hats for every occasion 


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Every Clasp has the name SMK~- X£ 
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COLLEGE NEWS 



COLLEGE CALENDAR 

February i i, 7.30, P. M., Mid-week prayer meeting of the Chris- 
tian Association. 
February 13, 3.20, P. M , in College Hall chapel. Author's reading 

by Rev. Henry van Dyke. I) D. 
February 14. n.oo, A M . Federation Sunday 

Services in Houghton Memorial chapel. 

Sermon by Rex . James G. K. McChire. D. D., of Lake Forest, 

Illinois. 

7. P. M.. vespers with special music. 
February 15, 3-6, P. M . reception of the Alpha Kappa Chi So- 
iv. 

7.30. P. M.. in College Hall chapel, lecture by Prof Rufus 

B. Richardson on Mycenae and Crete, 
lary 20, and 22, 7.30, P. M , Glee Club concert. 

COLLEGE NOTES. 

Sunday, February 14. is the Day of Prayer for Schools and 
Colleges, appointed by the Federation of Christian Associations. 
Daily prayer circles arc being conducted in all the campus 
and village houses during this preparatory Week of Prayer. Sun- 
day evening, a meeting for the leaders of circles in the campus 
houses was conducted by Miss Merrill. 

Whelpley. organist of Edward Everett: Hale's church 
in Boston played the organ after chapel Tuesday morning. Feb- 
ruary 2. Mr. Whelpley played two selections from Tschai- 
kv and "Sanctus" by Gounod. 

Thursday morning. February 1, Miss Edith Torrey, of the 
Music Department, sang "Elizabeth's Prayer." from Tann- 
hauser and "Elsa's Dream" from Lohengrin. Mr. Macdougall 
played the Bridal Chorus from Lohengrin. 

All students in Economics were invited to attend a lecture by 
Mr. Arthur Y. Woodworth in Boston. February 2.011 the subject 
Christian Socialism in England." 

A few copies of the 1904 Legenda may still be procured on ap- 
plication to Miss Elizabeth Taylor. 

The Glee Club concerts will be given on the evenings of the 
twentieth and twenty-second of February. 

Attention is called to the following, regarding the sale of 
tickel 

1. Members of the Faculty and Seniors will have the privilege 
Ming four tickets lor each of the concerts; other students, 

two. 

2. Each person must secure her own tickets. In case mem- 

iculty and Seniors cannot meet the office hours, 
- will be recen ed at the time of the office hours. The scats 
will then be reserved and may be claimed at the next office hours. 
Tickets sold to members of the Faculty and to Seniors will 
have on them "Faculty" and "Senior." tickets and will be 
transferable only to members of the Faculty and Seniors re- 
spectfully. Tickets so marked will not be received from other 
nts. 
Office hours for the sale of tickets. 

First concert — Faculty and Ushers, Wednesday. February to. 
9.45-12.30. 

First concert — Seniors Wednesday. February 10. 2 15-5.30. 
First concert — General office hours, Thursday, February 11. 



() 00-10.50. 

>nd concert 
9.00-10.50. 

ncert — 
j. .^0-4. 1 5. 

Second concert — Seniors. Thursday. February 
General for both concerts. Friday, February 12. 

eral for both concerts. Friday, February 12. 1.30-4. 15. 
Miss Sherwood's operetta for children, the name of which has 
been changed to "The Goose Girl," will be given Thursday even- 
ing and Friday evening at eight and Saturday afternoon at two, 
nary n, 12. and 13, at Potter Hall, Xew Century Building. 
177 Huntington avenue Tickets on sale at the box-office. 



— Faculty and Ushers. Thursday. February 11. 
General office hours Thursday. February 11. 



11. 1.30-4.15. 
9. 55-11.45. 



Shoes for College Girls. 

The Finest Line of $3.00 and $3.50 
Boots in Boston. Plain and Fancy 
Slippers Suitable for all occasions. 

Thayer, Rogers & Norton, 

144 Tremont Street, Boston. 

IN O Y E S B R O S . 

Ladies' Shirt Waists 
and Tub Dresses 



Made from Madras. Imported Cheviots, French 
Percales, English and French Flannels, 
Wash Silks, Serges, Butchers' Linen, Pique, 
Mercerized Cheviots, Silks and Satins, 

$6.50 to $50.00 

In number and variety of patterns, quality of fabric, THE 
CERTAINTY OF BEING FITTED, and the assurance 

that the styles are strictly new, our Shirt Waist Deptart- 
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L'XIIKH Mhs. TBAFTOH'S Caiik AS USUAL. 

Our New Shirtings 

For 1904 tor Men'* Wear are ready. 

Consult us to know THE LIINEIN, 

THE CRAVAT 
and THE GLOVES To Wear. 



NOYES BROS. 

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The Walnut Hill School for Girls, 



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Tuition and Board, $600.00 



ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUE. 



Miss Conant and Miss Bigelow, Principals. 



L. P. HOLLANDER & CO. 

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Millinery, Hats, Underwear and Gloves 

NEW SRRIINCj DESIGNS Now Ready. 

We call special attention to a large assortment of DRESSES MADE IN OUR OWN WORKROOMS for School 
and Street Wear at very reasonable prices. 

202 to 216 Boylston Street and Park Square, Boston 



COLLEGE NEWS 



CHRISTIAN A SSOCIA TION NOTES. 

At the mid-week meeting of the Christian Association. Thurs- 
day evening. February 4. the important question in regard to a 
General Secretary was decided. The enthusiasm prevailing over 
this matter was most gratifyingly expressed by the large number 
of girls present. After a very brief opening, the business in hand 
was taken up. A communication which had been sent by the 
Faculty body to the Association was read. In accordance with 
Section III of the Student Government Agreement, the Faculty 
sent the following conditions concerning the undertaking of 
this new responsibility: 

I. That a vote should be declared carried only in case of an 
attendance of seventy-five and a two-thirds' affirmative vote of 
this number, and that further, in order to secure an unmistak- 
able will of the Association such a vote should be valid only 
after the poles have been kept open two days at which not less 
than one-half of the members have voted and two-thirds of this 
number in the affirmative — no votes to be counted until after 
the poles are closed. 

II. The Association must present evidence of being able to 
meet the financial obligations involved, a sum of Si 00, to be 
counted on from the treasury of the Society. 

III. Such an officer if engaged is not to discharge the duties of 
any of the present officers or boards, nor to have a vote in any 
committee. 

IV. Xo steps are to be taken for anything further than the 
year 1904-5. 

The recommendations of the Committee appointed, which 
had been considered two weeks ago. were then taken up in turn 
and discussed the arguments being heard on both sides of the 
important points. A most encouraging and convincing report 
was given by the President on the financial condition. Three 
hundred and ninety-five dollars have already been pledged, and 
there are still the Faculty members. three College dormitories and 
all the Freshman class to be heard from: this added to the Si 00 
from the treasury makes S495. already at hand. After the dis- 
cussion was closed a motion was made to accept the report of the 
committee following out its recommendations in accordance with 
the suggesions of the Faculty. This was carried and the meeting 
closed. 

SOCIE TY N OTES 

The Agora held its regular monthly meeting on Saturday 
evening. January 30. 

Impromptu Speeches. 

1 . Senator Cullom's Bill Adele Ogden 

2. Latest News of Japan — Russian Affairs. .Alice D. Chapman 

3. The Outlook for the Presidential Nominations, 

Florence W. Hutsinpillar. Ethel B. Doak 
The subject for consideration at this meeting was the Panama 
Question and the following program was given : 

Outline and History of the Question Hilda Tufts 

Point of View of Colombia and her Defence Esther Gibbs 

Panama's Side of the Question Ray Tyler 

The Justifications of President Roosevelt's Actions. Fanny Field 

At the regular meeting of the Society Tau Zeta Epsilon, Satur- 
day. January 30. the following program was given: 

Michael Angelo. the Painter Ruth de Rochemont 

Preliminary Remarks on the Development of Music during the 

Renaissance Helen M Johnston 

Song. 'The Nightingale" Ora Williams 

"Andrea del Sarto. " Symonds. . . Carrie C. Soutter 

Song, "Ah! the Sighs'" Hetty S. Wheeler 

Pictures from Andrea del Sarto. 

Andrea del Sarto and his Wife Critics: Ruth Crosbv 

Emilv Freeman 
Detail from the Descent from the Cross . . Critics' Julia Tvler 

Laura Hibbard 

Sainte Barbe Critics: Edith Knowlton 

Ada Couillard 



IN O T E ! 



Wellesley Students will find 

Wright cSr Ditson's Store, 

344 Washington Street, Boston, 

An ideal place to purchase Athletic Supplies. They have the best 
and latest goods for each pastime: FIELD HOCKEY, TENNIS 
GOLF, BASKET BALL, FENXING. SKATES, SKATING and 
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Wright & Ditson are getting out a catalogue exclusively for ladies, 
which will be sent free to any address. 



STICKNEY & SMITH, 

1ST Tremont Street, Boston, 

Allow 10 per cent, discount to 
Teachers and Pupils of Welles- 
ley College on 

Ladies' Costumes, 
Street, Walking Suits, 
Skirts and Garments 

of All Kinds, 

Waists and Furs, 

(OUR ONLY STORE.) 



Intercollegiate Bureau of Academic Costume 

Chartered 1902. 
COTRELL & LEONARD, Albany, N. Y. 

Makers of the Caps, Gowns and 

Hoods to the American Colleges 

and Universities. 

Ilustrated Bulletins, Samples, Blanks, etc., on application 

Annie W. Stocking, (Wellesley '02) in charge of 
correspondence, may be addressed as above. 



WELLESLEY AND OTHER HOODS. 

B. A., $3.50 to $ 8.50; desirable, $ 5.50 

M. A., .... 6.75 " 16.50; " 10.50 

Ph. D. ... 8.50 " 22.00; " 13.50 

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F. L. Ccpples, Prop. 




COLLEGE NEWS 



FREE PRESS. 



i. 

The proposal of the editors to enlarge the realm of the Free 
Press by encouraging the contribution of articles giving the im- 
mediate impressions of the students in regard to the larger inter- 
ests of their college life will be heartily commended by alumna- 
readers of the News. The alumnae like to know not merely the 
facts about lectures, society meetings, and marriages; they like 
still better to know what to-day's students think about and how 
they are remoulding old traditions and shaping new ones. In 
what will seem like a very few minutes, present day students will 
join the larger body, and will find themselves still Wellesley 
girls. with the same old interest in Wellesley life. For Welles- 
ley's life is a vital progress, not bounded by any one's experience 
of four years. We are all a part of it. while we live. The rela- 
tion is intimate and ineradicable. To keep abreast of the pro- 
gress, and thus to learn how best to serve Wellesley, is the desire 
of every woman who has known the invigorating experience of 
undergraduate service. It is natural, then, that the alumnae 
should read with keenest interest the opinions and impressions 
of present day affairs which they hope to see in the Free Press. 
There is one, certainly, who will be more than ever grateful for 
the good work done, this winter, by College News. 

G. L. C, 1899. 

II. 
It is sometimes said that we, as women, have no sense of hu- 
mor. This might seem to be true, at first thoughts, when stu- 
dents in English 6, having been asked to write a humorous 
theme, go about the halls, almost with tears in their eyes, beg- 
ging to be told something funny, and hand in grave poems on 
the huge difficulty of their task. Is it true that we are so serious 
that we seldom see the ridiculous conceits, the absurdities, of 
this large and busy society? Surely not. Common-sense, the 
sense of proportions, and the casting of light on the self-decep- 
tions, the vanities and incongruities, on all that is out of propor- 
tion, are the cardinal factors in the rule of humor, according to 
Meredith, and these the thoughtful feminine mind of to-day 
surely possesses. Her serious nature, inherited from her more 
serious Puritan ancestors, who had no time to watch the Comedy 
of Manners in their age, makes her humor of a more thoughtful. 
of a deeper kind. Her sense of the pathetic, far more delicate 
than that of her brothers, makes her sensitive to a more refined 
sort of fun. Sometimes, weary from her too active life, she 
uses the stinging weapon of satire, but more often it is the very 
geniality of the feminine humor, mingling the sense of the moral, 
the pathetic, with the perception of the strictly ridiculous, that 
helps her to end all difficulties in a general voice of silvery laugh- 
ter. At least this is nearly the ideal. If we are far away from it. 
let us strive to store for ourselves these comic perceptions, 
"wells in the desert." Let us not blunt our sense of the hu- 
morous by too much punning, and talking in "Johnsonian poly- 
syllables." A course in humor is a mere suggestion. The elu- 
sive quality might be lost if we sought to analyze the different 
sorts of humor long in the classroom, but the training ourselves 
to appreciate the pedantry, the foolish pretensions, the inconsist- 
encies, of our life would help us to end all our troubles. 

J. L. B., 1904. 

III. 
Dear Editor: — What is the etiquette about bowing to your 
friends when you meet them out "punging" on a wood sleigh or a 
coal sledge"' I hardly know whether girls like to be seen, or are 
doing it sub rosa. Perhaps I am prejudiced in the matter, for, 
really, I am ashamed to see my friends enlarging their acquaint- 
ance among the drivers at just the rapid rate some of them have 
been adopting lately. — yet they might see me doing something 
worse, sometime! Please let me know in some of your summer 
issues. Your devoted reader. E. S. B.. 1904. 



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Cooking Utensils, 

Supplies fox* Churches, Colleges (EL Schools 

15 and \(> Faneuil Hkill Square, 

BOSTON, IV1ASS. 

Write for Prices. 

New Hotel Bellevue 



24 Winter Street, Boston 



klroim:a\ i'lax 



CENTRAL LOCATION 



BEACON STREET, near TREMONT 



BOSTON, MASS. 



Harvey & Wood 



COLLEGE NEWS 



A. SHUMAN & CO., Boston 

Ladies 1 Suits made by Men Tailors, Ladies' Coats. Ladies' 
Waists. Ladies' Negligee Gowns and Sacques. Ladies' Un- 
derwear, Ladies' Hosiery, Ladies' Shoes, Ladies' Gloves, 
Ladies' Complete Outfits. ... 

Shuman Corner. Washington and Summer Streets. 



]gWfiEfS 



CHOCOLATES 
SO and 60c per lb. 



DELICIOUS— DAINTY- PURE. 

416 Washington St., ( 4th door North of Summer St. ) 



Vn lentines-i 

— AT — 

Mrs. H. E. Currier's 

Grove Street, Wellesley. 

Edward E. Henry, D.M.D. 

(Grad. Harvard Univ. Dental School) 

Shattack's Block, . Wellesley. 
Hours 9- 13 and 3-5- 



SMITH BROTHERS, 

Butter, Cheese & Eggs, 

2 mid 4 New Faneuil Hall 

.Market. 

BOSTON, MASS. 

Sole Receivers of Randolph Cream- 
ery. 

MARY L. MORAN, 
Dressffial^g, 

Shaw Building, Wellesley, .Mass. 

latest pasl?ior?5, 
GEO. P. RAYMOND CO. 

Costume Parlors, 

2 Boylston Place, Boston 

Costumes tor private theatricals 

and Costume parties. 

John A Morgan & Co. 

PHARMACISTS, 

Shattuck Building, Wellesley, Mass. 



"Tom" Griffin, L ' ND w E E N LL s E T s L E v 

Carriages at Station on arrival of all trains. 

Reliable Horses and Carriages To Let. 

Personal Attention to all orders 

for evening trains. Order box at 

North Door of College Ball. 

BAGGAGK TBAKSFKBBED. 

TELEPHONE 101-6. 



James Korntved, 

Ladies' and Gents' Custom Tailor 

Shaw Block, Room 1, 

wellesley square. 

Special attention paid to pi 

and cleaning. 

H. L. FLAGG, 

Daily Papers, Periodicals, Sta- 
tionery, Etc. 

Wright & Ditson's sporting Goods 
Waban Block, Wellesley So. 



THE PARLIAMENT OF FOOLS. 

A BALLAD OF MR. A. CLOOTS.* 

You may burble of your Hutsinpillars, Etzenspergers 
Of Klingenhagens, Nusbickels, may talk until you're blue, 
But ne\ er will you find a man, till Gabriel's trumpet loots. 
With a much more pleasing cognomen than Anacharsis ("loots 

Then i wicz and Dvorak, who have manai 

g consonants; but if they worked that line, 
They'd be welcomed by th( ages and roots 

If they tried to dim the lustre of our Anachai 



I f he had 1 ieen a football star, we'll venture to opine 
That there would be few colleges whose herculean 1 i 

-land the yelling multitude who. to their usual roots. 
ed the fearsome combination — " Anacharsis ('loots'" 

5 Shoes would fade away to nothingness, that's straight; 
Walk-Over ones would hide their proud and haughty heads, and 
wait 
small, com enient hole to open for them, if some boots 
Were put upon the market named for Anacharsis ("loots. 

And think how all the magazines would light for all his <lri 

I low the publishers would sue for him. and Seton Thompson 

sni 
Thai his name was Thompson Seton Ernest now. and all galoots 
Who write, would long for such a name as Anacharsis ("loots ' 

There would s lie, there can be 110 doubt of 

that. 
For he'd ha\ e 1 een a capitalist, pompous, proud and fat : 
And a female college certainly'd be furnished with the fruits 
Of his thoughtful parents' efforts. — namely. Anacharsis ("loots. 

Of all poetic inspirations I have met of late. 

I I seems to me that this one works at an abnormal rate. 

I could write from now to Doomsday, and still there would be 

■ >ts 
Am! spurts of inspiration from dear Anacharsis ("loots. 

riefit of the hopelessly ignorant, whose nan 
ithor will explain that Anacharsis was a gentleman 
nenee during the French Revolution. On 
int of this discovery the author feels that her crammh 
been all in vain. 



Those wishing entertainment at 
the INN for their guests during 
the GLEE CLUB CONCERT 
Season, should make arrangements 
for the same by February 15. The 
management plans to cater to a lim- 
ited number at the usual rates. 



R. H. PORTER, 

Plumber. 

TIN AND SHEET IRON WORK 

1bot tlClatcr an& Steam Wearers, 
Scaler in Stoves, IRangcs, tiarbware, 
paints, ©its, Etc. 
Wellesley, PVI* 



Established 1875. 

Chas. E. Shattuck, 
GROCER, 

Wellesley Square. 



Qassiiis (TV jHall, 

Successor to A. B. Clark, 

THE GROCER, 

Washington St., Wellesley. 



B. S. COLE, 

Mutton, Lamb, Veal, Poultry 

and Game, 

Wholesale and Retail. 

Stalls 1 3 & 1 5 Faneuil Hall Market 

Tel. Connection. BOSTON 

F. A. Coolidge & Co., 

Dealers in 

Choice Meats & Provisions 

Washington St., Wellesley. 



J. TA1LBY & SON, 
FLORISTS, 

Wellesley, Opp. R. R. Station 

Orders by mail or otherwise 
promptly attended to. Con- 
nected by Telephone. 

HOLDEN'S STUDIO 

20 No. Ave., Natick, 

HIGH GRADE PORTRAITS. 

Connected by Telephone. 

New England Calcium Light Co, 

Manufacturers of Oxygen and Hydrogen 
Gas for Illuminations and Stereopticons 

CALCIUM LIGHTS, 
with Beautiful Colored Effects for Thea- 
tres, Tableaux, Balls, Processions, Out- 
Door Amusements, Etc. 
Laboratory, 9 WAY ST. BOSTON. 
Down Town Office, 353 Washington St. 

Russian Arts and 
Peasants' Industries. 

TECHNOLOGY BUILDING, 

Irvinglon St. and Huntington Ave. 
Near Huntington Ave. Station 
Boston, - Mass. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



ALUMNA NOTES. 



Miss Mary E. Woolley, Presidenl of Mount Holyoke College, 
and formerly Associate Professor of Biblical History at Welles- 
ley, gave an address on "Christian Citizenship" before the Young 
Men's Christian Association of Pawtucket, Rhode Island, on 
fanuary 3 1 

I),- Alice 11 Luce, 1883, has resigned her position as Dean oi 
Women and Professor of English at Oberlin College, where she 
has been for the past four years. She will continue her work 
through the present college year and then will leave tor Ger- 
many, to become proprietor and principal oi' the Willard Amer- 
ican School lor Girls m Berlin. Germany. 

Miss Alma E. Beale, [891, M. D., Johns Hopkins, has suc- 
ded to her father's practice in Shaghticoke, New York. 

s Mary Elizabeth Munger, 1894-1896, is at home again in 
Herkimer, 'New York, after spending the fall and winter in 
Chicago, studying mu 

Dr. Eleanor Stephenson, 1895, has recently been appointed to 
an interneship at the Woman's Hospital in Philadelphia 

Miss Myrtle B "■ [896, who has recently returned from 

abroad, is now living a1 74') Hartford Street, Los Angeles, Cali- 

i.i Her engagement to Mr. Theodore Crilev of Kansas City. 

whom she met while both were studying in Berlin, has just been 

announced, and the wedding is to take place in April. 

Miss Josephine Batchcldcr, [896, had a six months' leave of 
ence from the State Normal School in San Diego, California, 
and returned to her work in January. 

Gertrude Carter, 1896, is a1 Hankow. China. Besides study- 
ing for her last examination, she has charge of woman's work in 
two native churches, teaches music and English and preaches in 
Chinese twice a week. 

Miss Martha Bulks. 1896, is spending the winter in Vicksburg, 
Mississippi. Her address is 102 Drummond street. 

Mrs. Prances Hershey Moore, 1896, spent the summer abroad, 
and is now living at 34 "The Lexington," Indianapolis. Indiana. 

Miss Amy bane. 189.6, is studying Latin at the University of 
Michigan, Ann Arbor. 

Miss Mabel Sturgis, [902, who is secretary at the Walnut Hill 
School. Natick, Massachusetts, Started on Tuesday. January 26. 
to spend a vacation of two weeks visiting Wellesley friends in 
I'lamfield. New Jersey, and in New York City, 

MARRIAGES. 



Lawreni 1 br.\T. In Yarmouth, Maine. August 25, 1903, 
Miss Molly bunt. 1896, to Mr. Frank Lawrence. At home. 502 
West 144th street. Xew York City. 

Liyi-:i\ Tompkins. December 31, 1903, Miss Emery Tomp- 
kins, 1896, to Mr. Louis Lively of Atlanta. At home, 261S Col- 
iseum street. New Orleans. 



DEATHS. 



January 21. 1904, at Wilkesbarrc. Pennsylvania, Mrs. Lance, 
mother of Frances Lance Fcrrero. 1892, Harriet Lance Hall. 
[895, Marian E. Lance, 1895, Edith J. Lance, jooo. 

January 28, 1904, a1 Chicago, Illinois. Mrs. Yashti Chandler, 
mother i >i E ■■■ a Chandler. 

January 31, 1904. in Xew ton. Massachusetts, Benjamin F. 
Kendriek, father of Eliza H. Ixendrick, 1885. 



For the Land of the Mid = 

ght Lunch, 

1 

Original Deviled Ham 

Made from sugar-cured 
ham and fine, pure 
spices. Delicious 
for sandwiches, at 
lunch, picnic, or tea, 
and in the chafing 
dish. 

It may be bought at 
any good grocers, 
but be sure you see 
on the can T II E 
L I T T L E RE 1) 
DEVIL. 

Our book contains a lot of unique and practical receipts. We will 
send it free. WM. UNDERWOOD CO., Boston, Mass., U. S. A. 




Perhaps you've heard of Hatch's store? 
It's right on Summer street 

Perhaps you've heard of Hatch's store? 
You'll surely never find a more 
Complete assortment of all Oriental 
things to eat. 

Perhaps you've heard of Hatch's store ? 
It's right on Summer street. 

Remember 

HATCH'S, 

43 ano 45 Summer St., ©oston. 




Fruits and Vegetables, 

Hot-House Products and Canned Goods. 

SPECIAL ATTENTION GIVEN HOTEL, CI. UB 
AND FAMILY ORDER!. 

ISAAC LOCKE (Si CO., 

07, 99 ana IOI Faneuil Hall Market, - Boston 



WILLIAM LEAVENS & CO, 



C/3 

& 
W 

D 

H 
U 
< 

D 
Z 

< 



ft 
D 

Z 

D 




32 Canal Street, 

I BOSTON, MASS. 



on 
to 



Q- 



"O 
o 



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3 

cl 

n 

q_ 
© 

3_ 

EL 

<o 

Uo.' 

3 



COLLEGE NEWS 



RESOLUTIONS. 

Whereas, in December, 1903, the class of 1Q05 suffered the 
loss of a former member. Mary T. Hinckley, whose brave and 
cheery spirit will ever be an inspiration to all who knew her, 
Be it Resolved: That the Class of 1905 hereby expre 
sorrow at her death and its warmest sympathy for the g] 
her family. 

And be it Futrher Resolved: That these resulotions be sent 
r family and that they be published in the College News 
of Wellesley College. Signed 

Louise Phillips Greene, 
Ellen Russei l Manchester, 
Ger'trudi \ Eaton. 

On September 10. 1903, the Missionary Department of the 
Christian Association sent twenty-five dollars to the Si hool for 
the Deal at Cheefoo, China. A post card, containing the follow- 
ing greeting, has keen received lately by the editor of the College 

N E W S 

"School for the Deal". Cheefoo, China. 
"December r, 1903. 
"The School sends Christmas and New Year's Greeting 1 
friends and thanks them for their help and interest, and takes 
this Opportunity to announce that its debt has been reduced 
from $6,875 (silver), to $2,000. Pray for us." 

Missionary Fund of the Christian Association. 

Total amount pledged to .Missionary Fund, 1902-1903. .Si, 297. 23 

Total amounted collected of pledges 1,144.98 

Christmas collection for Dinah Pace 18.50 

Total amount S1.163.4S 

Appropriations of 1902-1903. 

January 17. To Woman's Board of Foreign Missions 

for Dr. Julia Bissell ... 

April 17. To Dr. Barker for box for India 25.00 

February [9. To Dr. Barker for box for India 25.00 

May 16 For Scholarship for Mexican boy at Atr 

Xew Mexici 1 10.00 

June 25. To Woman's Board for Dr. Julia Bissell. . . . 100.00 
June 25. For fitting up Operating Room in new hos- 
pital to be known as Wellesley College Operating 

Room, at Ahmadnagar. India 500.00 

September 10. Y \Y. C, A. at Candy, Ceylon 10.00 

10. School for Deaf at Cheefoo. China. . . . 25.00 

10. For Dinah Pace 69.97 

10. For money orders .65 

10. For postage 

Total Appropriations $1,144.98 

Christmas Offering to Dinah Pace S 18.50 

Grand Total $1,163.48 

Caroline M. Breyfogle, Chairman; 
Mary Beltzhoover Jenkins, 1903, 
Lillian II. BRUCE, 1903, 
Martha Nutting Brooks, 1904, 

Kl GENIE LODWICK. I905, 

Connie M. Guion, 1906. 
The accounts have been examined by Mr. Guild and found 
corn 



HERRICK'S, 

COPLEY SQUARE, NEAR BACK BAY POST-OFFJCE, 

BEST TICKETS FOR ALL THE THEATRES. 

Phone now 2329, 2330 and 2331 



Chickerino- Pianos 

o - 

The OLDEST in AMERICA : 
THE BEST in the WORLD 

WRITE FOR CATALOGUE 

Chickering &? Sons 

PIANOFORTE MAKERS 

BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 



Mr. Jolm Forsythe, 

865 BROADWAY, NEW YORK, 

Has the horror to announce that on 

FRIDAY, February 19th, 

SATURDAY, February 20th, 

He will display the New Styles in 

WAISTS, NECKWEAR, GLOVES, ETC, 

For the Spring and Summer Seasons, 1904, at 

The Wellesley Inn, 

Wellesley, Mass. 

You are cordially requested to call and inspect 
his suburb assortment. 



E. T. SLATTERY CO. 

NeW WalRillg vS\litS of Fine Imported Mixtures 

Ne\V Veiling DreSSeS from the latest Paris Models 

NEW FRENCH MILLINERY AND NECKWEAR.. 

We recommend the Fairfax Linen Waist to Wellesley College Girls. 
154 and 155 Tremont Street, Boston